Flir Downloads

  1. Electronic Component Testing: A Non-Contact Sport
    9/11/2015

    The smaller and more powerful an electronic device becomes, the more damage can be caused from its inherent heat. Designers are continuously looking for ways to keep components cool while maintaining the quality and integrity of performance. Thermal imaging with infrared cameras offers a non-contact testing platform with instantaneous results. This application note discusses how the FLIR A6700 Thermal Camera is used in thermal management and can contribute to advancements in circuit board design.

  2. With Thermal Cameras, Image Matters
    8/26/2015

    Not all thermal security cameras are created equal. If and when professionals look to purchase a thermal imaging camera, there are a whole set of specifications and performance parameters that may be unfamiliar. Instead of basing a decision on the analysis of specifications, take time to see the image quality for yourself, because image quality matters. This case study discusses how a thermal imaging camera’s resolution is typically measured, and why it is important to know for making the right thermal camera choice.

  3. Thermal Security Cameras Protect The Home Turf
    8/25/2015

    As Brigham Young University finished over $1 million worth of renovation to their football field, questions arose as to how they would secure it at all hours of the day, especially after dark. During the process of finding which security technology to use, they temporarily installed a thermal security camera from FLIR Systems on a tripod in the stadium press box. This helped them resolve three trespasses within the first week alone. This case study discusses how Brigham Young University benefitted from installing FLIR’s thermal security cameras into their security systems.

  4. Cooled vs. Uncooled Thermal Imaging
    4/29/2015

    Thermal imaging cameras have been used by scientists, researchers and R&D specialists for many years in a variety of applications.This application note describes the difference between cooled and uncooled thermal imaging cameras, and when to use them in applications such as industrial R&D, academics and research, and defense and aerospace.

  5. Science-Grade LWIR Infrared Camera: FLIR SC6700 SLS Datasheet
    2/3/2015

    FLIR’s SC6700 SLS is an LWIR camera providing 640 x 512 pixel resolution. It features a Strained Layer Supperlattice detector, fast snap shot image integration, an advanced filter wheel design, on-camera radiance and thermographic calibration, and MATLAB compatibility.

  6. Using Thermal Imaging To Detect Small Nerve Fiber Dysfunction
    1/21/2015

    While the dysfunction of large nerve fibers can be assessed using standard neurological examination and electromyography (EMG), currently no noninvasive techniques exist to detect and quantify small fiber dysfunction.

  7. Using Thermal Imaging For Companion Diagnostics
    1/14/2015

    This application note describes how researchers from the clinical research center of Charité Berlin use a thermal imaging camera from FLIR to analyze and objectify the body’s response to various allergens and evaluate how antihistamines can modulate the development of symptoms.

  8. Thermal Research Camera: T650sc Datasheet
    6/20/2013

    This thermal research camera provides 640 x 480 infrared imagery and is incredibly versatile, ideal for applications ranging from outdoor field use to R&D lab applications. For information on its features and specifications, download the datasheet.

  9. Thermal Research Camera: T630sc Datasheet
    6/20/2013

    This thermal research camera provides 640 x 480 infrared imagery and is incredibly versatile, ideal for applications ranging from outdoor field use to R&D lab applications. For information on its features and specifications, download the datasheet.

  10. Compact Scientific Infrared Camera: T450sc Datasheet
    6/20/2013

    The T450sc compact scientific infrared camera employs an uncooled microbolometer detector that features real-time temperature calibrated movie recording at 30 Hz to an SD card, and is optimized for image analysis of spot meters, auto hot/cold detection, differences in temperature, isothermals, alarms, and line profiles.