White Papers and Case Studies

  1. White Paper: Ultra Low Timing Jitter Performance And Characterization Of Origami Femtosecond Laser Series
    6/17/2010
    Compact, industrial-grade optical pulse sources with very low timing jitter and sufficient power are becoming a key building block in many advanced applications. Particularly, the recent advances in the measurement and control of the carrier-envelope offset frequency have greatly expanded the range of possible applications of such frequency combs. Therefore, the off-the-shelf availability of industrial-grade femtosecond and picosecond optical pulses sources is vital for wide application areas. In response to this imminent need, Onefive GmbH has released a series of ultra-short pulsed lasers qualified for industial applications. These lasers are based on the successful Origami-platform which has already been adopted industry-wide.
  2. Fiber Laser Chirped Pulse Amplifier
    5/13/2010
    Fiber lasers are known to offer advantages in maintaining stable operation over years, low total cost of ownership, and predictable operation in a small package. Few mirrors need aligning. At high power, the fiber laser provides simpler heat removal of high powers in a long thin fiber. The simplicity of a fiber removes the need for water cooling, and usually air cooling or conduction cooling is sufficient. The fiber laser can usually be more compact, important for embedded applications. For these and other reasons, industrial and medical laser sources have been migrating to fiber lasers where possible.
  3. White Paper: Brightlock® Pump Diodes Take The Heat Out Of High Power Lasers
    5/11/2010
    Power scaling of diode pumped lasers has accelerated dramatically over the past ten years, breaking through the 100 kW barrier for the first time in 2010 and 10kW from a single mode fiber a few months earlier. Looking forward, in addition to keeping the power scaling curve on the upswing, system designers are now faced with the incredible challenges of minimizing heat dissipation, power consumption, and cost of ownership.
  4. Brightlock® Pump Diodes Take The Heat Out Of High Power Lasers
    5/11/2010
    Power scaling of diode pumped lasers has accelerated dramatically over the past ten years, breaking through the 100 kW barrier for the first time in 2010 and 10kW from a single mode fiber a few months earlier. Looking forward, in addition to keeping the power scaling curve on the upswing, system designers are now faced with the incredible challenges of minimizing heat dissipation, power consumption, and cost of ownership.
  5. White Paper: Testing With Femtosecond Pulses
    3/19/2010
    Calmar’s femtosecond laser sources are passively mode-locked fiber lasers. Passive mode-locking makes these lasers easier to operate than actively mode-locked lasers, as no external RF clock signal is required, and little or no warm-up time is needed. Temperature control is also less of an issue with passive mode-locked lasers. By Calmar Laser, Inc.
  6. Laser Sources For Next-Generation Solar Cells
    11/19/2009
    As solar cell and panel manufacturers emerge from the credit crisis, new process tools are set to enter production lines for increased module efficiency. This market-driven pull demands improved laser-based process tools and a broader range of laser types than used historically by the solar industry. Final laser source selection depends ultimately on a range of different factors being satisfied. This article explains the fundamental drivers that form the basis of laser source adoption within the solar industry. Where is the “pull”? What are the timescales involved? Why have certain laser sources been prioritized within production lines to date? And what are the trends that are most likely to change the equipment-type landscape during the next 10 years? By Finlay Colville, Coherent, Inc.
  7. White Paper: Laser Sources For Next-Generation Solar Cells
    11/19/2009
    As solar cell and panel manufacturers emerge from the credit crisis, new process tools are set to enter production lines for increased module efficiency. This market-driven pull demands improved laser-based process tools and a broader range of laser types than used historically by the solar industry. Final laser source selection depends ultimately on a range of different factors being satisfied. This article explains the fundamental drivers that form the basis of laser source adoption within the solar industry. Where is the “pull”? What are the timescales involved? Why have certain laser sources been prioritized within production lines to date? And what are the trends that are most likely to change the equipment-type landscape during the next 10 years? By Finlay Colville, Coherent, Inc.