Latest Headlines

  1. New High-Speed Optical Power Meter Supports Fast Photonics Alignment Applications
    4/25/2018

    The new F-712.PM1 high speed optical power meter from precision photonics alignment manufacturer PI (Physik Instrumente) converts optical signals and currents of photodiodes into a high resolution, logarithmic analog voltage signal. Its high bandwidth of 20kHz enables faster optical alignment, when used in conjunction with PI’s high speed FMPA photonics alignment systems for SiP (Silicon Photonics) applications. The extended wavelength range of 400 to 1550nm allows working in both the visible and infrared range without switching.

  2. Watching Nanomaterials Form In 4D
    4/25/2018

    When famed physicists Max Knoll and Ernst Ruska first introduced the transmission electron microscope (TEM) in 1933, it allowed researchers to peer inside cells, microorganisms and particles that were once too small to study.

  3. Excitons In 2D Materials: Breaking Strong Attraction
    4/25/2018

    ICFO researchers unveil how excitons in 2D materials split into free carriers in next-generation photodetectors and solar cells.Some of the most important technologies of our time, such as photovoltaics and optical communication systems, rely on the conversion of light into electricity.

  4. Achieving Unprecedented Frequency Control In Miniature Lasers
    4/25/2018

    Only a few decades ago, finding a particular channel on the radio or television meant dialing a knob by hand, making small tweaks and adjustments to hone in on the right signal. Of course, we now take such fine tuning for granted, simply pressing a button to achieve the same effect.

  5. Speeding Up Material Discovery
    4/25/2018

    In even the most fuel-efficient cars, about 60 percent of the total energy of gasoline is lost through heat in the exhaust pipe and radiator. To combat this, researchers are developing new thermoelectic materials that can convert heat into electricity. These semiconducting materials could recirculate electricity back into the vehicle and improve fuel efficiency by up to 5 percent.

  6. Ultrahigh-Pressure Laser Experiments Shed Light On Cores Of ‘Super-Earth’ Exoplanets
    4/25/2018

    Scientists have identified more than 2,000 of these “super-Earths,” exoplanets that are larger than Earth but smaller than Neptune, the next-largest planet in our solar system. By studying how iron and silicon alloys respond to extraordinary pressures, scientists are gaining new insights into the nature of super-Earths and their cores.

  7. Quantum Dots Enable Faster, Easier Photon Detection, More Secure Data
    4/25/2018

    A team of researchers including U of A engineering and physics faculty has developed a new method of detecting single photons, or light particles, using quantum dots.

  8. Turning Graphene Into Light Nanosensors
    4/25/2018

    Graphene has many properties; it is e.g. an extremely good conductor. But it does not absorb light very well. To remedy this limiting aspect of what is an otherwise amazing material, physicists resort to embedding a sheet of graphene in a flat photonic crystal, which is excellent for controlling the flow of light.

  9. Nuclear Radiation Detecting Device Could Lead To New Homeland Security Tool
    4/25/2018

    A Northwestern University and Argonne National Laboratory research team has developed an exceptional next-generation material for nuclear radiation detection that could provide a significantly less expensive alternative to the detectors now in commercial use.

  10. Researchers Create Precision Optical Components With Inkjet Printing
    4/25/2018

    Researchers have developed an inkjet printing technique that can be used to print optical components such as waveguides. Because the printing approach can also fabricate electronics and microfluidics, it could advance a variety of devices such as optical sensors used for health monitoring and lab-on-a-chip devices that integrate and automate multiple laboratory functions onto a small circuit, or chip.