Editor’s Picks

  1. Lasers Could Take 3D Printing To Next Level At Clemson University
    11/28/2018

    Cars that go more than 1,000 miles on a single fill-up and smartphones that can run for days without recharging are among the possibilities that could come out of a new Clemson University research project that brings together 3D printing and laser processing.

  2. Borophene Advances As 2-D Materials Platform
    12/3/2018

    Borophene—two-dimensional (2-D) atom-thin-sheets of boron, a chemical element traditionally found in fiberglass insulation—is anything but boring. Though boron is a nonmetallic semiconductor in its bulk (3-D) form, it becomes a metallic conductor in 2-D.

  3. The Force Of The Vacuum
    11/30/2018

    Scientists from the Theory Department of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL) in Hamburg have shown through theoretical calculations and computer simulations that the force between electrons and lattice distortions in an atomically thin two-dimensional superconductor can be controlled with virtual photons.

  4. Brilliant Iron Molecule Could Provide Cheaper Solar Energy
    11/30/2018

    Some photocatalysts and solar cells are based on a technology that involves molecules containing metals, known as metal complexes. The task of the metal complexes in this context is to absorb solar rays and utilise their energy.

  5. Spotting Nature’s Own Evolution Of Quantum Tricks Could Transform Quantum Technology
    11/22/2018

    A new test to spot where the ability to exploit the power of quantum mechanics has evolved in nature has been developed by physicists at the University of Warwick.

  6. Colloidal Quantum Dots Make LEDs Shine Bright In The Infrared
    12/3/2018

    The ideal optoelectronic semiconductor material should be a strong light emitter i.e. should emit light very efficiently upon optical excitation as well as be an efficient charge conductor to allow for electrical injection in devices.

  7. Earth's Magnetic Field Measured Using Artificial Stars At 90 Kilometers Altitude
    11/14/2018

    The mesosphere, at heights between 85 and 100 kilometers above the Earth's surface, contains a layer of atomic sodium. Astronomers use laser beams to create artificial stars, or laser guide stars (LGS), in this layer for improving the quality of astronomical observations.

  8. Quantum Computing At Scale: Australian Scientists Achieve Compact, Sensitive Qubit Readout
    11/27/2018

    Professor Michelle Simmons’ team at UNSW Sydney has demonstrated a compact sensor for accessing information stored in the electrons of individual atoms – a breakthrough that brings us one step closer to scalable quantum computing in silicon.

  9. Atomic Jet – The First Lens For Extreme-Ultraviolet Light Developed
    11/28/2018

    Scientists from the Max Born Institute (MBI) have developed the first refractive lens that focuses extreme ultraviolet beams. Instead of using a glass lens, which is non-transparent in the extreme-ultraviolet region, the researchers have demonstrated a lens that is formed by a jet of atoms.

  10. FAU Researchers Develop A Process To Measure Nanorods Quickly And Accurately
    11/26/2018

    Process engineers at FAU have developed a method which allows the size and shape of nanoparticles in dispersions to be determined considerably quicker than ever before.