Editor’s Picks

  1. Tech Increases Microfluidic Research Data Output 100-Fold
    11/7/2017

    Researchers have developed a technique that allows users to collect 100 times more spectrographic information per day from microfluidic devices, as compared to the previous industry standard.

  2. Ford's Argo AI Buys LiDAR Startup Princeton Lightwave
    11/2/2017

    Ford-controlled Argo AI has acquired New Jersey-based Princeton Lightwave, a developer of LiDAR (light detection and ranging) cameras and sensors for autonomous driving vehicles, for an undisclosed amount.

  3. Wind Satellite Vacuum Packed
    11/2/2017

    With liftoff on the horizon, ESA’s Aeolus satellite is going through its last round of tests to make sure that this complex mission will work in orbit.

  4. Mechanochemistry Paves The Way To Higher Quality Perovskite Photovoltaics
    11/7/2017

    For several years, tension has been rising in line with the approaching commercialization of perovskite photovoltaic cells. Now, there has been another small earthquake: it turns out that devices based on these materials can convert solar energy into electricity even more efficiently! There is one condition: instead of producing perovskites by traditional solution methods, they should be produced by ... grinding.

  5. New Insights On ‘Captured’ Electrons Could Improve Flash Memory
    11/7/2017

    An entirely new model of the way electrons are briefly trapped and released in tiny electronic devices suggests that a long-accepted, industry-wide view is just plain wrong about the way these captured electrons affect the behavior of hardware components such as flash memory cells.

  6. Nanoparticles Can Limit Inflammation By Distracting The Immune System
    11/8/2017

    A surprise finding suggests that an injection of nanoparticles may be able to help fight the immune system when it goes haywire, researchers at the University of Michigan have shown.

  7. MIT Researchers Use Chalcogenides To Stretch And Integrate Photonic Devices
    11/9/2017

    Scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) are using chalcogenide glasses to produce flexible hybrid electronics (FHE) that can stretch or conform to the shape of an object or structure without damage, and to better integrate two-dimensional (2D) materials with conventional semiconductor circuits.

  8. Crystals In A Pink X-Ray Beam
    11/2/2017

    A newly developed experimental set-up allows the X-ray structure determination of biomolecules such as proteins with far smaller samples and shorter exposure times than before. At so-called synchrotron sources, protein crystal can be studied considerably more efficiently and quickly by using broad-spectrum X-rays.

  9. New Approach Uses Light Instead Of Robots To Assemble Electronic Components
    11/7/2017

    An international team of researchers has developed a new light-based manipulation method that could one day be used to mass produce electronic components for smartphones, computers and other devices.

  10. Using Nanotubes To Detect And Repair Cracks In Aircraft Wings, Other Structures
    10/1/2007
    Adding even a small amount of carbon nanotubes can go a long way toward enhancing the strength, integrity, and safety of plastic materials widely used in engineering applications, according to a new study