Thermal Cameras White Papers

  1. Four Reasons Thermal Cameras Can Improve Automatic Emergency Braking And Save Lives
    7/17/2019

    The U.S.-based Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA) estimates there were 6,200 pedestrians killed in traffic accidents in the U.S. in 2018, the highest total since 1990. The GHSA also found that during the past 10 years, nighttime crashes accounted for more than 90 percent of the total increase in pedestrian deaths. To solve this problem, automotive researchers and developers must consider multi-sensing solutions, including thermal cameras that “see” heat energy, with layered levels of protection to ensure safety in all common driving situations. This article presents four reasons why thermal imaging cameras should be used to save lives on the road.

  2. Why HOT MWIR Might Be A Better Fit Than Uncooled LWIR
    6/10/2019

    While cooled mid-wave infrared (MWIR) cameras have long held a tactical advantage over uncooled longwave infrared (LWIR) cameras, they also have been more mechanically complex, larger, heavier, more power-hungry, and more costly than uncooled LWIR cameras. 

  3. Improving Additive Manufacturing With The Help Of Infrared
    5/9/2019

    Additive manufacturing technologies create components directly from a computer model, adding material only where needed. This app note discusses how infrared cameras can help manufacturers find systematic problems and determine the changes needed to maintain product quality.

  4. Detecting And Visualizing Hydrocarbon Gas Leaks With MWIR Cameras
    9/25/2018

    MWIR cameras capture images below the red end of the visible color spectrum at the peak absorption of emissions of hydrocarbon gases such as methane, propane, and butane, helping guarantee the safety of oil and gas industry workers, as well as protecting the environment and reducing repair costs.

  5. Part 4: Overcoming Technical And Logistical Automotive Integration Challenges
    9/20/2018

    Safe advanced driver assist system (ADAS) vehicles and autonomous vehicles (AV) require the use of sensors to deliver scene data adequate for the detection and classification algorithms to autonomously navigate under all conditions. This requirement cannot be adequately met with just visible cameras, sonar, and radar sensors. Thermal, or longwave infrared (LWIR), cameras can detect and classify pedestrians in darkness, fog, and sun glares, and deliver improved technical and logistical integration for ADAS systems. This white paper is Part 4 of the series how thermal infrared cameras overcome technical and logistical integrations challenges in autonomous driving.

  6. Part 3: The Pathway To Affordable, Scalable Automotive Integration
    9/20/2018

    Safe advanced driver assist system (ADAS) vehicles and autonomous vehicles (AV) require the use of sensors to deliver scene data adequate for the detection and classification algorithms to autonomously navigate under all conditions. This requirement cannot be adequately met with just visible cameras, sonar, and radar sensors, as they do not meet many safety concerns in real conditions. Thermal, or longwave infrared (LWIR), cameras can detect and classify pedestrians in darkness, fog, and sun glares, delivering improved situational awareness in ADAS and AV. This white paper is Part 3 of the series on how thermal infrared cameras deliver an affordable, scalable and integrative solution over other sensor technologies for autonomous driving.

  7. Part 2: Technical Advantages Of Thermal Cameras In ADAS And AV Platforms
    9/20/2018

    This white paper is Part 2 of the series on the technical advantages that thermal infrared cameras deliver over other technologies for autonomous driving.

  8. Part 1: Why ADAS And Autonomous Vehicles Need Thermal Infrared Cameras
    9/20/2018

    Safe advanced driver assist system (ADAS) vehicles and autonomous vehicles (AV) require the use of sensors to deliver scene data adequate for the detection and classification algorithms to autonomously navigate under all conditions for SAE automation level 5. This challenging requirement cannot be adequately met with just visible cameras, sonar, and radar sensors. As a solution, thermal, or longwave infrared (LWIR), cameras can detect and classify pedestrians in darkness, fog, and sun glares, delivering improved situational awareness in ADAS and AV. This white paper is Part 1 of a series on why thermal infrared cameras are a necessity for autonomous driving.

  9. Electronic Component Testing: A Non-Contact Sport
    8/23/2018

    The smaller and more powerful an electronic device becomes, the more damage can be caused from its inherent heat. Designers are continuously looking for ways to keep components cool while maintaining the quality and integrity of performance.

  10. FLIR T500-Series Macro Mode: Single-Lens Solution For Imaging Small Targets
    6/14/2018

    Thermal cameras are used throughout many stages of R&D and quality assurance. Electronics inspection is one of the most common applications for thermal imaging, which typically involves finding hot spots on printed circuit board assemblies (PCBAs) and ensuring that various components are working within their design limits.