SWIR Cameras white papers and application notes

  1. Why SWIR And InGaAs Are Useful
    8/4/2017

    Sensing in the shortwave infrared (SWIR) range (wavelengths from 0.9 to 1.7 microns) has been made practical by the development of indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) sensors. This white paper covers the importance of using InGaAs technologies in SWIR applications.

  2. Short-Wave Infrared Cameras In Semiconductor Inspection Applications
    4/13/2017

    The semiconductor industry has grown to cover a wide variety of applications such as those with memory integrated circuits for PCs or mobile devices, solar cells, and many more electronic devices. Within the semiconductor industry, SWIR cameras can be used for inspecting the quality of pure semiconductor material after ingot growth, the alignment of a saw blade or laser, failure analysis, and other semiconductor inspection applications. This white paper discusses several applications of SWIR (short-wave infrared) cameras within semiconductor inspection applications, especially those that rely on the capability of SWIR cameras to see through semiconductor materials, such as silicon.

  3. Short-Wave Infrared Adaptive Optics And Applications
    2/23/2017

    This article introduces adaptive optics and the benefits of using (short-wave) infrared cameras in wavefront sensing for applications including astronomy, laser communication, biological imaging microcopy, and retinal imaging in combination with optical coherence tomography.

  4. SWIR Camera Utilized In Cutting Edge Tornado Research
    2/2/2017

    A team of researchers at Purdue University’s Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences Department recently tested the practicality of using shortwave infrared (SWIR) imaging for improving the detection of poorly-visible tornadoes in supercell thunderstorms. The team turned their attention to the Churchill Navigation ION digital recorder. The recorder’s ION and CameraLink adapter allowed the team to quickly connect and record video and metadata simultaneously from two different types of cameras; a SWIR camera provided by Sensors Unlimited and a visible-light camera.

  5. Understanding High Performance SWIR Imaging Cameras
    9/14/2016

    The use of imaging systems for capturing long wavelength photons continues to increase in many diverse application areas including life sciences, security and surveillance, non-destructive testing, quality control and astronomy.  This white paper discusses the performance of InGaAs detector arrays with sensitivities in the VIS-SWIR region.

  6. Silicon Wafer Alignment With SWIR Cameras
    9/14/2016

    Since InGaAs cameras are sensitive from 900 nm to 1800 nm in the Short Wave Infra-Red (SWIR) range, they are very valuable when monitoring wafer bonding. In the SWIR spectrum, pure silicon is transparent at room temperature, while heavily doped silicon becomes more and more opaque as the temperature increases over 200°C. Imaging wafer plates using modern SWIR allows for extremely precise alignment thanks to their high sensitivity, speed, and ease of use.

  7. Laser-Gated Imaging
    8/24/2016

    Laser-gated imaging is a technique for night vision that detects and recognizes targets at long range without the need for any natural light sources. This article discusses its general principles, as well as the advantages of imaging in different spectral bands in visible and infrared light.

  8. SWIR And The U-2
    8/4/2016

    The U-2 spy plane is the leading reconnaissance platform for the United States. The camera used in today’s U-2, SYERS, uses electronic sensors to see in both the mid-wave infrared (MWIR) band (thermal energy) and the short wave infrared (SWIR) band (reflected light).

  9. The Third Infrared Window
    8/4/2016

    Long wave infrared (LWIR) and mid-wave infrared (MWIR) sensors and cameras have been used in military settings for detecting human activity through thermal emissions. Using the short wave infrared (SWIR) portion of the spectrum extends unique capabilities that often compliment LWIR and MWIR imaging. 

  10. NIR InGaAs Pixel Chip Fabrication
    8/4/2016

    InGaAs pixel chips are utilized in various products including 2D NIR/SWIR cameras, NIR/SWIR linear arrays and avalanche photodiodes (APDs). This application note presents the process of creating NIR pixel chips starting at the crystal growth of semiconducting InGaAs on an InP substrate wafer to the product inspection.