Technical Articles

  1. DNA-PAINT: A Super-Resolution Microscopy Technique
    10/16/2018

    Researchers have used super-resolution techniques to perform imaging below the classical diffraction-limit of light with extraordinary precision. The recently introduced super-resolution method DNA-PAINT is based on transient DNA-DNA interactions. This white paper discusses the DNA-PAINT microscopy technique and how sCMOS cameras are well suited for these kinds of measurements.

  2. Choosing High-Speed Cameras For Aerospace Testing
    10/12/2018

    For years high-speed imaging has provided engineers with detailed analysis of projective tracking, missile launches, combustion testing, engine testing, fuselage testing, component testing, materials testing, flow visualization and more. There are several companies that manufacture high-speed cameras, so how do you decide which company to buy from and which model of camera to buy? This article discusses the many factors that are important to consider when purchasing a high-speed camera for aerospace testing.

  3. How To Choose The Right Camera For Your Automotive Application
    10/12/2018

    Automotive engineers are continually faced with new vehicle safety requirements and highway emissions standards. The auto industry therefore requires advanced imaging systems to analyze video of everything from onboard and offboard vehicle safety tests to static airbag deployments.

  4. The Right Filter Is Key To Lower-Cost And Faster Time-To-Market MWIR Equipment
    10/4/2018

    Midwave (MWIR) infrared light is important in many hardware applications and optical filters are critical to success. Some simple practices can help avoid over specifying filter characteristics and driving up costs.

  5. Key Material Properties: Augmented Reality Waveguides
    10/1/2018

    Augmented reality must still surpass major technical hurdles, particularly in the way AR devices deliver images to the eye. Already, systems that were once promising have been analyzed and largely discarded.

  6. Detecting And Visualizing Hydrocarbon Gas Leaks With MWIR Cameras
    9/25/2018

    Midwave Infrared (MWIR) cameras work by capturing images below the red end of the visible color spectrum at the peak absorption of emissions of hydrocarbon gases such as methane, propane and butane, which are often odorless and invisible to the naked eye. Using these MWIR cameras to detect emissions helps guarantee the safety of people working in the oil and gas industry, as well as help protect the environment and reduce costs of repairs.

  7. Part 4: Overcoming Technical And Logistical Automotive Integration Challenges
    9/20/2018

    Safe advanced driver assist system (ADAS) vehicles and autonomous vehicles (AV) require the use of sensors to deliver scene data adequate for the detection and classification algorithms to autonomously navigate under all conditions. This requirement cannot be adequately met with just visible cameras, sonar, and radar sensors. Thermal, or longwave infrared (LWIR), cameras can detect and classify pedestrians in darkness, fog, and sun glares, and deliver improved technical and logistical integration for ADAS systems. This white paper is Part 4 of the series how thermal infrared cameras overcome technical and logistical integrations challenges in autonomous driving.

  8. Part 3: The Pathway To Affordable, Scalable Automotive Integration
    9/20/2018

    Safe advanced driver assist system (ADAS) vehicles and autonomous vehicles (AV) require the use of sensors to deliver scene data adequate for the detection and classification algorithms to autonomously navigate under all conditions. This requirement cannot be adequately met with just visible cameras, sonar, and radar sensors, as they do not meet many safety concerns in real conditions. Thermal, or longwave infrared (LWIR), cameras can detect and classify pedestrians in darkness, fog, and sun glares, delivering improved situational awareness in ADAS and AV. This white paper is Part 3 of the series on how thermal infrared cameras deliver an affordable, scalable and integrative solution over other sensor technologies for autonomous driving.

  9. Part 2: Technical Advantages Of Thermal Cameras In ADAS And AV Platforms
    9/20/2018

    Safe advanced driver assist system (ADAS) vehicles and autonomous vehicles (AV) require the use of sensors to deliver scene data adequate for the detection and classification algorithms to autonomously navigate under all conditions. This requirement cannot be adequately met with just visible cameras, sonar, and radar sensors, as they do not meet many safety concerns in real conditions. Thermal, or longwave infrared (LWIR), cameras can detect and classify pedestrians in darkness, fog, and sun glares, delivering improved situational awareness in ADAS and AV. This white paper is Part 2 of the series on the technical advantages that thermal infrared cameras deliver over other technologies for autonomous driving.

  10. Part 1: Why ADAS And Autonomous Vehicles Need Thermal Infrared Cameras
    9/20/2018

    Safe advanced driver assist system (ADAS) vehicles and autonomous vehicles (AV) require the use of sensors to deliver scene data adequate for the detection and classification algorithms to autonomously navigate under all conditions for SAE automation level 5. This challenging requirement cannot be adequately met with just visible cameras, sonar, and radar sensors. As a solution, thermal, or longwave infrared (LWIR), cameras can detect and classify pedestrians in darkness, fog, and sun glares, delivering improved situational awareness in ADAS and AV. This white paper is Part 1 of a series on why thermal infrared cameras are a necessity for autonomous driving.