Xenics Articles

  1. Application Note: Cheetah-640CL For High Speed Imaging In SWIR
    12/29/2009
    The laser beams used for free-space satellite communication emit typically at 1060 nm or 1550 nm (eye-safe and low atmospheric attenuation). In reduced region of interest mode of, e.g., 100 x 100 pixels, the Cheetah camera can achieve well over 10.000 fps. This feature of the camera is being used in adaptive optics systems to correct imaging systems for atmosphere turbulence. The high speed Cheetah camera, mounted behind a Shack-Hartmann sensor to measure the wave distortion, provides active feedback to the deformable telescope mirror in order to have a corrected wavefront on the highspeed demodulator.
  2. Application Note: Cheetah-640CL For High Speed Imaging In SWIR
    12/29/2009
    The laser beams used for free-space satellite communication emit typically at 1060 nm or 1550 nm (eye-safe and low atmospheric attenuation). In reduced region of interest mode of, e.g., 100 x 100 pixels, the Cheetah camera can achieve well over 10.000 fps. This feature of the camera is being used in adaptive optics systems to correct imaging systems for atmosphere turbulence. The high speed Cheetah camera, mounted behind a Shack-Hartmann sensor to measure the wave distortion, provides active feedback to the deformable telescope mirror in order to have a corrected wavefront on the highspeed demodulator.
  3. Article: Night-Vision Camera Combines Thermal And Low-Light-Level Images
    8/26/2008
    Even on moonless but starlit nights, highly sensitive InGaAs cameras still produce good images for short-wavelength infrared. By thinning the image sensor chip and with illumination right through the substrate, the wavelength range of the detectors can be extended into the visible spectrum to then span 400 – 1700 nm. Together with uncooled microbolometer arrays for long-wavelength infrared, this allows the design of universal analysis tools which can take advantage of the fusion of optical and thermal images
  4. Night-Vision Camera Combines Thermal And Low-Light-Level Images
    8/26/2008
    Even on moonless but starlit nights, highly sensitive InGaAs cameras still produce good images for short-wavelength infrared. By thinning the image sensor chip and with illumination right through the substrate, the wavelength range of the detectors can be extended into the visible spectrum to then span 400 – 1700 nm. Together with uncooled microbolometer arrays for long-wavelength infrared, this allows the design of universal analysis tools which can take advantage of the fusion of optical and thermal images