Xenics Articles

  1. Application Note: Machine Vision: Key Tool For Efficient And Low-Cost Solar Cells
    6/15/2011
    The cost of electricity produced from sunlight employing the photovoltaic (PV) effect is currently significantly higher compared to electricity produced from fossil fuels such as coal. By Xenics
  2. Application Note: XEVA 1.7 320 TE3 For Low Light Level Imaging
    5/5/2011
    All chip manufacturers aim for highest possible yields to meet ever tighter cost constraints. As a precondition, any imaginable source of failure must be uncovered already in the design phase, during pilot processing as well as in volume manufacturing.
  3. Application Note: SWIR Imaging In Solar Cell Inspection
    12/29/2009
    Solar cells are large-area semiconductor devices with typical dimensions of 15 cm. Loss mechanisms such as locally reduced diffusion lenghts or parallel resistances often reduce the energy conversion efficiency of solar cells. Characterization techniques that can provide spatially resolved information about the performance of a solar cell therefore are important to manufacturers not only in research and development but also in solar cell production.
  4. Application Note: SWIR Imaging In Solar Cell Inspection
    12/29/2009
    Solar cells are large-area semiconductor devices with typical dimensions of 15 cm. Loss mechanisms such as locally reduced diffusion lenghts or parallel resistances often reduce the energy conversion efficiency of solar cells. Characterization techniques that can provide spatially resolved information about the performance of a solar cell therefore are important to manufacturers not only in research and development but also in solar cell production.
  5. Application Note: Cheetah-640CL For High Speed Imaging In SWIR
    12/29/2009
    The laser beams used for free-space satellite communication emit typically at 1060 nm or 1550 nm (eye-safe and low atmospheric attenuation). In reduced region of interest mode of, e.g., 100 x 100 pixels, the Cheetah camera can achieve well over 10.000 fps. This feature of the camera is being used in adaptive optics systems to correct imaging systems for atmosphere turbulence. The high speed Cheetah camera, mounted behind a Shack-Hartmann sensor to measure the wave distortion, provides active feedback to the deformable telescope mirror in order to have a corrected wavefront on the highspeed demodulator.
  6. Application Note: Cheetah-640CL For High Speed Imaging In SWIR
    12/29/2009
    The laser beams used for free-space satellite communication emit typically at 1060 nm or 1550 nm (eye-safe and low atmospheric attenuation). In reduced region of interest mode of, e.g., 100 x 100 pixels, the Cheetah camera can achieve well over 10.000 fps. This feature of the camera is being used in adaptive optics systems to correct imaging systems for atmosphere turbulence. The high speed Cheetah camera, mounted behind a Shack-Hartmann sensor to measure the wave distortion, provides active feedback to the deformable telescope mirror in order to have a corrected wavefront on the highspeed demodulator.
  7. Article: Night-Vision Camera Combines Thermal And Low-Light-Level Images
    8/26/2008
    Even on moonless but starlit nights, highly sensitive InGaAs cameras still produce good images for short-wavelength infrared. By thinning the image sensor chip and with illumination right through the substrate, the wavelength range of the detectors can be extended into the visible spectrum to then span 400 – 1700 nm. Together with uncooled microbolometer arrays for long-wavelength infrared, this allows the design of universal analysis tools which can take advantage of the fusion of optical and thermal images
  8. Night-Vision Camera Combines Thermal And Low-Light-Level Images
    8/26/2008
    Even on moonless but starlit nights, highly sensitive InGaAs cameras still produce good images for short-wavelength infrared. By thinning the image sensor chip and with illumination right through the substrate, the wavelength range of the detectors can be extended into the visible spectrum to then span 400 – 1700 nm. Together with uncooled microbolometer arrays for long-wavelength infrared, this allows the design of universal analysis tools which can take advantage of the fusion of optical and thermal images