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Live From SPIE Optics + Photonics 2011: Xenics Camera Demonstrations

Source: Xenics
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Bob Grietens, CEO of Xenics, demonstrates several cameras that were on display at the show, including the Onca family, which holds cooled infrared engines, both in the midwave and in the long wave, even in the very long wave, going up to more than 11 microns.

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Video Transcript

Welcome everybody. Bob Grietens from Xenics here at the SPIE show in San Diego. It is Optics + Photonics 2011. It's been over five years that we have been coming here to present our products. It's very good to see all the international people coming around trying to find out what's new with our products and making sure that they get the latest information.

The first product line that we are demonstrating here is our Onca family. It's a family that holds cooled infrared engines, both in the midwave or in the long wave, even in the very long wave, going up to more than 11 microns.

It can hold high-speed applications up to about 300 frames per second, if you do 320 x 256, or above 400 frames per second in the 640 x 512 configuration. There's a filter wheel inside for spectral applications, and you can even do super framing for high-dynamic-range applications.

The next product line that I want to introduce here is our uncooled line based on bolometer technology for the camera on the left. It's a Gobi camera with 640 x 480 pixels, which allows you to go up to 50-hertz frame rate in full frame or even up to 200 hertz, going down windowed to about 160 by 120 pixels.

On the right, you see the camera operating in the SWIR. It's an InGaAs camera, available in 320 x 256 or 640 x 512, also operating at video rates. You can have these cameras with different types of interfaces. It can be a camera link or a GigE or an analog video out.